So I returned to the library, and I found the second book to the Septimus Heap series. Evidently, it was only available on OverDrive. This is an app one can download and then check out e-books from your local library with. Outstanding!

However, my true intent in going to the library was to talk to someone there about doing a book signing. They were excited about doing one; however, to be perfectly honest, I feel silly doing one at the library . . . but I will. I do intend to do one at my brother-in-law’s comic shop Jomio and Rueliete’s Cards and Comics.

Assassin Marked

#SaturdaySwag

Don’t forget to share the story with your friends.

Don’t forget to follow this blog.

Don’t forget to breathe.

I had meant to get this post out earlier, but I hadn’t made it home all day. Now I am here, and I’m still going to do my #SaturdaySwag post even though it’s technically Sunday.

~ Michael C. Sahd

 

Many writers will share that real life experiences inspire the tales they tell. Many, myself included, scoff (or have scoffed) at such a statement; telling themselves, “My life isn’t nearly so interesting.” What I have learned, however, is that this is rarely the case. Experiences take place daily, and though they may be mundane to you, they won’t be after “enhancing” them.

Just the other day, I took a trip to the local library to find the second book to the Septimus Heap series. I, of course, found Angie Sage’s books fairly quickly, and although they had many of her books, the one I wanted was not on the shelf. Naturally, I asked the librarians to see if it was checked out. It wasn’t.

I informed the lady at the counter that I had looked and it wasn’t there; she responded by telling me to look around, because people don’t always put them back in the right place. A little disheartened, I went back to look again (I had already looked around the nearby shelves, duh). After not finding it, I went back to the librarians for help. Instead of helping, they shrugged and said it could be anywhere. I left, rather annoyed by their lack of help.

However, the librarians were interesting characters, and a version of this scene has already inserted into my next story with Damian. I have changed many of the details and spiced it up a bit, but the entire scene is inspired by this short interaction.

Your experience doesn’t need to be Hollywood material. Just the smallest interaction, large enough to catch your attention, but not much more than that, can turn into a scene in your book. Take notes, make a voice memo, or just tell someone about it, and you will be able to get it down on paper. Embellishing the experience into an interesting scene is what makes you a writer.
And no . . . I still have not found the second book to the Septimus Heap series.

Septimus Heap, Book Two: Flyte by [Sage, Angie]